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How to Feel About Albert Pujols After You Forgot He Burned St. Louis

13 Mar

This off season, Albert Pujols became one of the biggest free agent players to hit an open market since Lebron James. It came down to his desire to be one of the highest paid players in the game, and his loyalty to the only organization he ever knew.  In the end, he and his family felt slighted over what they felt was a sub par offer from St. Louis, and chose to sign a 10-year, $254 million dollar contract to join the Los Angeles Angels. Albert switched leagues and joined the AL, where you figure he’ll play a significant role as a DH somewhere down the line.  Consider it a wise move for a player with mild concerns over his actual age, nevermind that he followed the money.

Now that the dust has settled, and uh, new dust is kicking around Continue reading

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Beard of the Week: January 26

26 Jan

It’s Thursday! Which means it’s time for yet one more lovely beard to be honored over here at Beard of the Week!

Let’s go back to the sports world, with the help of pal (and new roomie!), Justin, I’ve come across quite a beard.

Pitcher for the San Francisco Giants, Brian Wilson!

I think that photograph says it all. Continue reading

Edwin Jackson’s Value

4 Jan

There are 3 reasons why Edwin Jackson is about to make a bunch of money: he’s an above-average pitcher; he’s in his prime; Scott Boras is his agent. Boras, according to an a study by baseballprospectus.com, earns his clients an extra 14 percent over market value, and in-prime above-average pitchers never sign for less than 10 million a year for fewer than 3 years. Making 3 years 34 million a minimum after the Boras factor. But the market for starting pitching may be collapsing after the signings of CJ Wilson, Mark Buehrle, and many of the bargain options. Jackson is at risk of becoming the next Johnny Damon Continue reading

Clubhouse Confidential

1 Jan

Clubhouse Confidential, weeknights at5:30 pm on the MLB network, accomplishes something I thought was as unlikely to happen on a baseball show as another player hitting .400 is on the baseball field. It provides insightful, easily understandable analysis  and all the while remains entertaining without lowering itself to pitting two polarizing figures arguing a’ la everything on ESPN.

Brian Kenny compliments the show’s SABR slant because he is not some baseball outsider trying to be Billy Beane’s character in the Moneyball movie. The show is for Continue reading

Baseball’s Free Agency

27 Dec

Baseball free-agent classes are determined to be strong or weak based on the quality of the players available in a given off-season. What is sometimes lost in this assessment is that there is not a direct correlation between the quality of players available and the marginal return that player provides. For example Albert Pujols is sure prove a more productive signing this off-season than Casey Kotchman, but at 26 million a season versus an estimated 5 million, not more valuable.

To relate this to a different market, stock-brokers have proven no more effective at picking stocks than random selection; what this proves is Continue reading

Joe Saunders

24 Dec

Baseball Prospectus may rescind my membership for this statement, but I’m going to say it anyways: I don’t think Joe Saunders is a bad pitcher. In fact, I think his career 69-52 record, and 4.16 ERA prove he’s a pretty good pitcher. Sure Saunders doesn’t have swing and miss stuff, and his career FIP is half a run higher than his ERA; however, did he deserve to be derided as worthless when he was traded to the Diamondbacks or non-tendered by the same team after a season with an ERA of 3.69 in 2011?
As much as I love statistical analysis, I’m not in love with Continue reading

Ryan Braun’s Purist Problem

15 Dec

Major League Baseball has a problem that the other three major sports leagues in this country don’t have to worry about.   I’m not talking about steroids or other performance enhancing drugs, (since, let’s be honest, they ALL have that problem.)  You see the NFL, NBA, and NHL have all embraced change and progression as their particular league evolves, as well as when technology allows them to.  The problem baseball has is the nagging, tired idea of the purist; an unorganized group of people who believe that baseball should never change, and that the game is still as good as it was back in them good ‘ole days.  Things such as instant replay on home run calls, or computerized strike zones can never truly get off the ground because of them.  They worry about the “integrity of the game.”  That is a phrase purists use Continue reading